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My Columns About Media

Journalism Ethics and Responsible Reporting.

By: IJAZ KHAN SAHU

Some main points of Journalism ethics and responsible reporting.

  • Ø Journalists and organizations should report the issue, not to promote that as being a member of any party.
  • Ø Be conscious of the editorial of your organizations.
  • Journalist should be keeping himself impartial regarding to each report.
  • Ø Journalist should do his job as a Journalist. He should not try to be the justice.
  • Ø Every controversial package or report should balance (should not one sided).
  • His job of Journalist that he must do his work as a dig deeper.
  • Ø Do respect to every to every victimized person.
  • Ø While humanitarian reporting, each issue of report, reason of issue, solution of issue, version of related expert must include. Use simply word and language, simple sentence construction should simplest.
  • Ø Suppose you are doing work on dengue virus, you should include in your report victim, then you should make relevant questions in your package. Like below
    • What are the symptoms of Dengue virus?
    • How can one protect himself from dengue virus?
    • What are relative care elements regarding dengue virus?
    • Ø If you are making a report on social issue in any village, town, or city school maters like water mater, sevarage mater you must include version of citizens and officials as well.
    • Ø Keep in mind some points while taking interview.
      • Firstly make understand your questions to following person.
      • Not try to be emotional, don’t show your facial expression. Be polite; be normal, during interview, live shows. E.T.C.
      • Don’t try to put question by body jesters.
      • Keep your level maintain with that person with whom you during talking.
      • During interview you should include open ended and close ended questions, don’t repeat your questions again and again. If someone doesn’t give the exact answer, just change your words and put your desired questions in other words.
      • Be impartial in each and every circumstance, Even if your family issue.
      • Don’t plagiarized someone’s words or version with yours.
      • Ø Be polite while reporting some accident case.
      • Ø Deprived, innocent, victims etc such type of words should not include every report.
      • Ø It someone in Trauma situation, don’t make your talking style harsh, instead of that you must be affectionate.
      • Ø You must include humanity touch in your reports.
      • Ø In every dangerous situation like that of bomb blast, protest, crucial circumstance you should safe yourself.
      • Ø Religious reporting is so sensitive so don’t speak even single word against any religious scholar, leader. Don’t speak even one word that can tease someone.
      • Ø In religious reporting, you should present whatever you see. Reality should your priority.
      • Never criticize the culture of any party.
      • Ø Keep in mind you are just Journalist. Not members of any political party, legislative committee and religious party.
      • Ø Don’t try to be guardian of any one.
      • Ø While investigative reporting if someone provides you some information, firstly confirm all of that by your own resources.  Privacy matters should be protected. Because privacy is a most power full tool for investigative report.

      Some journalism related  useful links are below.

Via http://www.journalism.org

Principles of Journalism

In 1997, an organization then administered by PEJ, the Committee of Concerned Journalists, began a national conversation among citizens and news people to identify and clarify the principles that underlie journalism. After four years of research, including 20 public forums around the country, a reading of journalism history, a national survey of journalists, and more, the group released a Statement of Shared Purpose that identified nine principles. These became the basis for The Elements of Journalism, the book by PEJ Director Tom Rosenstiel and CCJ Chairman and PEJ Senior Counselor Bill Kovach. Here are those principles, as outlined in the original Statement of Shared Purpose.

A Statement of Purpose

After extended examination by journalists themselves of the character of journalism at the end of the twentieth century, we offer this common understanding of what defines our work. The central purpose of journalism is to provide citizens with accurate and reliable information they need to function in a free society.

This encompasses myriad roles–helping define community, creating common language and common knowledge, identifying a community’s goals, heroes and villains, and pushing people beyond complacency. This purpose also involves other requirements, such as being entertaining, serving as watchdog and offering voice to the voiceless.

Over time journalists have developed nine core principles to meet the task. They comprise what might be described as the theory of journalism:
1. Journalism’s first obligation is to the truth

Democracy depends on citizens having reliable, accurate facts put in a meaningful context. Journalism does not pursue truth in an absolute or philosophical sense, but it can–and must–pursue it in a practical sense. This “journalistic truth” is a process that begins with the professional discipline of assembling and verifying facts. Then journalists try to convey a fair and reliable account of their meaning, valid for now, subject to further investigation. Journalists should be as transparent as possible about sources and methods so audiences can make their own assessment of the information. Even in a world of expanding voices, accuracy is the foundation upon which everything else is built–context, interpretation, comment, criticism, analysis and debate. The truth, over time, emerges from this forum. As citizens encounter an ever greater flow of data, they have more need–not less–for identifiable sources dedicated to verifying that information and putting it in context.

2. Its first loyalty is to citizens

While news organizations answer to many constituencies, including advertisers and shareholders, the journalists in those organizations must maintain allegiance to citizens and the larger public interest above any other if they are to provide the news without fear or favor. This commitment to citizens first is the basis of a news organization’s credibility, the implied covenant that tells the audience the coverage is not slanted for friends or advertisers. Commitment to citizens also means journalism should present a representative picture of all constituent groups in society. Ignoring certain citizens has the effect of disenfranchising them. The theory underlying the modern news industry has been the belief that credibility builds a broad and loyal audience, and that economic success follows in turn. In that regard, the business people in a news organization also must nurture–not exploit–their allegiance to the audience ahead of other considerations.

3. Its essence is a discipline of verification

Journalists rely on a professional discipline for verifying information. When the concept of objectivity originally evolved, it did not imply that journalists are free of bias. It called, rather, for a consistent method of testing information–a transparent approach to evidence–precisely so that personal and cultural biases would not undermine the accuracy of their work. The method is objective, not the journalist. Seeking out multiple witnesses, disclosing as much as possible about sources, or asking various sides for comment, all signal such standards. This discipline of verification is what separates journalism from other modes of communication, such as propaganda, fiction or entertainment. But the need for professional method is not always fully recognized or refined. While journalism has developed various techniques for determining facts, for instance, it has done less to develop a system for testing the reliability of journalistic interpretation.

4. Its practitioners must maintain an independence from those they cover

Independence is an underlying requirement of journalism, a cornerstone of its reliability. Independence of spirit and mind, rather than neutrality, is the principle journalists must keep in focus. While editorialists and commentators are not neutral, the source of their credibility is still their accuracy, intellectual fairness and ability to inform–not their devotion to a certain group or outcome. In our independence, however, we must avoid any tendency to stray into arrogance, elitism, isolation or nihilism.

5. It must serve as an independent monitor of power

Journalism has an unusual capacity to serve as watchdog over those whose power and position most affect citizens. The Founders recognized this to be a rampart against despotism when they ensured an independent press; courts have affirmed it; citizens rely on it. As journalists, we have an obligation to protect this watchdog freedom by not demeaning it in frivolous use or exploiting it for commercial gain.

6. It must provide a forum for public criticism and compromise

The news media are the common carriers of public discussion, and this responsibility forms a basis for our special privileges. This discussion serves society best when it is informed by facts rather than prejudice and supposition. It also should strive to fairly represent the varied viewpoints and interests in society, and to place them in context rather than highlight only the conflicting fringes of debate. Accuracy and truthfulness require that as framers of the public discussion we not neglect the points of common ground where problem solving occurs.

7. It must strive to make the significant interesting and relevant

Journalism is storytelling with a purpose. It should do more than gather an audience or catalogue the important. For its own survival, it must balance what readers know they want with what they cannot anticipate but need. In short, it must strive to make the significant interesting and relevant. The effectiveness of a piece of journalism is measured both by how much a work engages its audience and enlightens it. This means journalists must continually ask what information has most value to citizens and in what form. While journalism should reach beyond such topics as government and public safety, a journalism overwhelmed by trivia and false significance ultimately engenders a trivial society.

8. It must keep the news comprehensive and proportional

Keeping news in proportion and not leaving important things out are also cornerstones of truthfulness. Journalism is a form of cartography: it creates a map for citizens to navigate society. Inflating events for sensation, neglecting others, stereotyping or being disproportionately negative all make a less reliable map. The map also should include news of all our communities, not just those with attractive demographics. This is best achieved by newsrooms with a diversity of backgrounds and perspectives. The map is only an analogy; proportion and comprehensiveness are subjective, yet their elusiveness does not lessen their significance.

9. Its practitioners must be allowed to exercise their personal conscience

Every journalist must have a personal sense of ethics and responsibility–a moral compass. Each of us must be willing, if fairness and accuracy require, to voice differences with our colleagues, whether in the newsroom or the executive suite. News organizations do well to nurture this independence by encouraging individuals to speak their minds. This stimulates the intellectual diversity necessary to understand and accurately cover an increasingly diverse society. It is this diversity of minds and voices, not just numbers, that matters.

Thank You

Regards,

IJAZ KHAN SAHU

https://www.facebook.com/pages/IJAZ-KHAN-SAHU/163300753720769

 

Quotes About Journalism

Only Honest Person can be a good Journalist who  can do justice with his profession .
“Jessamine recoiled from the paper as if it were a snake. “A lady does not read the newspaper. The society pages, perhaps, or the theater news. Not this filth.”
“But you are not a lady, Jessamine—,” Charlotte began.
Thomas Jefferson  “The man who reads nothing at all is better educated than the man who reads nothing but newspapers.” ― Thomas Jefferson
Mahatma Gandhi“I believe in equality for everyone, except reporters and photographers.”― Mahatma Gandhi
Warren Ellis“You’re miserable, edgy and tired. You’re in the perfect mood for journalism.” ― Warren Ellis
Hillary Rodham Clinton “If I want to knock a story off the front page, I just change my hairstyle.” ― Hillary Rodham Clinton
G.K. Chesterton “Journalism largely consists in saying “Lord Jones is dead” to people who never knew Lord Jones was alive.” ― G.K. Chesterton
Jean-Paul Sartre “Better a good journalist than a poor assassin.”  ― Jean-Paul Sartre
Thomas Jefferson “The most truthful part of a newspaper is the advertisements.” ― Thomas Jefferson
Hunter S. Thompson “So much for Objective Journalism. Don’t bother to look for it here–not under any byline of mine; or anyone else I can think of. With the possible exception of things like box scores, race results, and stock market tabulations, there is no such thing as Objective Journalism. The phrase itself is a pompous contradiction in terms.”  ― Hunter S. Thompson,
John Grogan “In the English language, it all comes down to this: Twenty-six letters, when combined correctly, can create magic. Twenty -six letters form the foundation of a free, informed society.”― John Grogan,
“When there is no freedom, there is no creativity.” ― Soud Qbeilat
Walter Cronkite “I think being a liberal, in the true sense, is being nondoctrinaire, nondogmatic, non-committed to a cause – but examining each case on its merits. Being left of center is another thing; it’s a political position. I think most newspapermen by definition have to be liberal; if they’re not liberal, by my definition of it, then they can hardly be good newspapermen. If they’re preordained dogmatists for a cause, then they can’t be very good journalists; that is, if they carry it into their journalism.”― Walter Cronkite
Dan Rather “I had someone at the Houston police station shoot me with heroin so I could do a story about it. The experience was a special kind of hell. I came out understanding full well how one could be addicted to ‘smack,’ and quickly.” ― Dan Rather
Amin Maalouf “People sometimes imagine that just because they have access to so many newspapers, radio and TV channels, they will get an infinity of different opinions. Then they discover that things are just the opposite: the power of these loudspeakers only amplifies the opinion prevalent at a certain time, to the point where it covers any other opinion.” ― Amin Maalouf,
Noam Chomsky “No honest journalist should be willing to describe himself or herseif as ’embedded.’ To say, ‘I’m an embedded journalist’ is to say, ‘I’m a government Propagandist.”― Noam Chomsky,
William T. Sherman “I think I know what military fame is; to be killed on the field of battle and have your name misspelled in the newspapers.”
                 ― William T. Sherman
Norman Mailer “If a person is not talented enough to be a novelist, not smart enough to be a lawyer, and his hands are too shaky to perform operations, he becomes a journalist. ”― Norman Mailer
Oscar Wilde “By giving us the opinions of the uneducated, journalism keeps us in touch with the ignorance of the community.”― Oscar Wilde
Fran Lebowitz “Magazines all too frequently lead to books and should be regarded by the prudent as the heavy petting of literature.” ― Fran Lebowitz
“This seems charmingly paradoxical: scientists seek one truth but often voice many opinions; journalists often speak of many truths while voicing a uniform view.” ― Christopher Essex,
Christopher Hitchens “I had become too accustomed to the pseudo-Left new style, whereby if your opponent thought he had identified your lowest possible motive, he was quite certain that he had isolated the only real one. This vulgar method, which is now the norm and the standard in much non-Left journalism as well, is designed to have the effect of making any noisy moron into a master analyst.”― Christopher Hitchens,
Helen Thomas “I don’t think a tough question is disrespectful.”― Helen Thomas
Matthew Arnold “Journalism is literature in a hurry.”― Matthew Arnold
Max Brooks “Looking back, I still can’t believe how unprofessional the news media was. So much spin, so few hard facts. All those digestible sound bites from an army of ‘experts’ all contradicting one another, all trying to seem more ‘shocking’ and ‘in-depth’ than the last one. It was all so confusing, nobody seemed to know what to do.”― Max Brooks,
John Pilger “It is not enough for journalists to see themselves as mere messengers without understanding the hidden agendas of the message and the myths that surround it.”― John Pilger,
Malcolm Gladwell “The ethics of plagiarism have turned into the narcissism of small differences: because journalism cannot own up to its heavily derivative nature, it must enforce originality on the level of the sentence.”― Malcolm Gladwell,
Dan Rather “I got addicted. News, particularly daily news, is more addictive than crack cocaine, more addictive than heroin, more addictive than cigarettes. ”― Dan Rather
“…looking back, has this journalism experience been a nightmare for you?’
‘Not entirely.’
‘Did you enjoy any of it?’
‘I liked going to the library,’ he says. ‘I think I prefer books to people — primary sources scare me.”
Tom Rachman,
John Pilger“We are beckoned to see the world through a one-way mirror, as if we are threatened and innocent and the rest of humanity is threatening, or wretched, or expendable. Our memory is struggling to rescue the truth that human rights were not handed down as privileges from a parliament, or a boardroom, or an institution, but that peace is only possible with justice and with information that gives us the power to act justly.”

Christopher Hitchens “I became a journalist because I did not want to rely on newspapers for information.” ― Christopher Hitchens

Nora Ephron “The image of the journalist as wallflower at the orgy has been replaced by the journalist as the life of the party.” ― Nora Ephron
Thomas de Quincey “But my way of writing is rather to think aloud, and follow my own humours, than much to consider who is listening to me; and, if I stop to consider what is proper to be said to this or that person, I shall soon come to doubt whether any part at all is proper.”
Thomas de Quincey,
Chinua Achebe “The foreign correspondent is frequently the only means of getting an important story told, or of drawing the world’s attention to disasters in the making or being covered up. Such an important role is risky in more ways than one. It can expose the correspondent to actual physical danger; but there is also the moral danger of indulging in sensationalism and dehumanizing the sufferer. This danger immediately raises the question of the character and attitude of the correspondent, because the same qualities of mind which in the past separated a Conrad from a Livingstone, or a Gainsborough from the anonymous painter of Francis Williams, are still present and active in the world today. Perhaps this difference can best be put in one phrase: the presence or absence of respect for the human person.”
Chinua Achebe
“In fact, among the people I met, the term soviet served essentially as a synonym for ‘fucked up’. I’d been in the country about three days when a car that was sent to take me to an interview failed to start. After several attempts to get it going, the driver turned to me, smiled wearily and explained: ‘Soviet car’. By that time, that was all the explanation I needed.”
Anthony DeCurtis
Craig Ferguson

“I realize that I am not a journalist. So anything I say is not important. ”
Craig Ferguson
Barbara Kingsolver “But newspapers have a duty to truth,’ Van said.
Lev clucked his tongue. ‘They tell the truth only as the exception. Zola wrote that the mendacity of the press could be divided into two groups: the yellow press lies every day without hesitating. But others, like the Times, speak the truth on all inconsequential occasions, so they can deceive the public with the requisite authority when it becomes necessary.’
Van got up from his chair to gather the cast-off newspapers. Lev took off his glasses and rubbed his eyes. ‘I don’t mean to offend the journalists; they aren’t any different from other people. They’re merely the megaphones of the other people.”
Barbara Kingsolver
Isabel Allende

“He understood then that all his exploits as a reporter, the feats that had won him such recognition and fame, were merely an attempt to keep his most ancient fears at bay, a stratagem for taking refuge behind a lens to test whether reality was more tolerable from that perspective.”
Isabel Allende
“Take away the newspaper—and this country of ours would become a scene of chaos. Without daily assurance of the exact facts—so far as we are able to know and publish them—the public imagination would run riot. Ten days without the daily newspaper and the strong pressure of worry and fear would throw the people of this country into mob hysteria—feeding upon rumors, alarms, terrified by bugbears and illusions. We have become the watchmen of the night and of a troubled day. . . .”
Harry Chandler
Denis Diderot

“All things must be examined, debated, investigated without exception and without regard for anyone’s feelings.”
Denis Diderot
Naomi Klein “Despite different cultures, middle-class youth all over the world seem to live their lives as if in a parallel universe. They get up in the morning, put on their Levi’s and Nikes, grab their caps and backpacks, and Sony personal CD players and head for school.”
Naomi Klein
H.L. Mencken

“American journalism (like the journalism of any other country) is predominantly paltry and worthless. Its pretensions are enormous, but its achievements are insignificant.”
H.L. Mencken
“They had holes to fill on every page and jammed in any vaguely newsworthy string of words provided it didn’t include expletives, which they were apparently saving for their own use around the office.”
Tom Rachman,
David Baldacci

“Pender laughed. “Verify? In this day and age? Who cares about verifying anything? It’s all about the speed. Who gets there first defines the truth. You know that as well as any man living.”
David Baldacci
Jonathan Maberry “Reporters trade in pain. It sells papers. Everyone knows that.”
Jonathan Maberry
Mario Quintana

“O jornalista é um poeta delicado: sempre acha o rascunho mais sincero do que o publicado.”
Mario Quintana
“He cannot deny a certain relief in being able to sift through academic tomes, fulfilling his journalistic duty without having to barge past security guards at the Arab League or grab man-on-the-street from women at the market. This library work is easily his favorite part of reporting so far.”
Tom Rachman,
Jeff Rice “Sherman Reilly Duffy of the pre-World War I CHICAGO DAILY JOURNAL once told a cub reporter, ‘Socially, a journalist fits in somewhere between a whore and a bartender. But spiritually he stands beside Galileo. He knows the world is round.’ Well, socially I fit in just fine between the whore and the bartender. Both are close friends. And I knew the world was round. Yet, as time went by I found myself confronted with the ugly suspicion that the world was, after all, flat and that there were things dark and terrible waiting just over the edge to reach out and snatch life from the unlucky, unwary wanderer.”
Jeff Rice
Gavin John Adams “The primary purposes of the political pamphlets of the early 1700s were neither to enlighten nor educate the masses, but to incite partisan conversation and spread commensurate ideas . . . Facts were not permitted to fetter the views they espoused, and the restraints of objective journalistic credibility were discarded by pamphleteers bent on promoting subjective slant to an insatiable general public for whom political dissonance was an integral part of social interaction.”
Gavin John Adams,
Richard Brinsley Sheridan “The newspapers! Sir, they are the most villainous — licentious — abominable — infernal — Not that I ever read them — no — I make it a rule never to look into a newspaper.”
Richard Brinsley Sheridan,
Mira Grant “We were the ones on scene when everything went down. We weren’t better. We weren’t worse. We were just the ones standing in the blast radius.”
Mira Grant,
Andrew Vachss

“A free press doesn’t mean it’s not a tame press.”
Andrew Vachss
Arthur Conan Doyle “The Times is a paper which is seldom found in any hands but those of the highly educated.”
Arthur Conan Doyle,
Ted Conover

“…what I’m getting at is like the distinction between tourist and a traveler. The tourist experience is superficial and glancing. The traveler develops a deeper connection with her surroundings. She is more invested in them — the traveler stays longer, makes her own plans, chooses her own destination, and usually travels alone: solo travel and solo participation, although the most difficult emotionally, seem the most likely to produce a good story.”
Ted Conover
Hélder Câmara

“In the developed countries of the capitalist world, the mass media are beginning to become businesses, and huge businesses at that. The freedom of journalists is now becoming, in most cases, a very relative thing: it ends where the interests of the business begin… In socialist areas, it is enough to recall that the means of social communication are the monopoly of the party.”
Hélder Câmara
John Pilger

“Many journalists now are no more than channelers and echoers of what George Orwell called the ‘official truth’. They simply cipher and transmit lies. It really grieves me that so many of my fellow journalists can be so manipulated that they become really what the French describe as ‘functionaires’, functionaries, not journalists. Many journalists become very defensive when you suggest to them that they are anything but impartial and objective. The problem with those words ‘impartiality’ and ‘objectivity’ is that they have lost their dictionary meaning. They’ve been taken over… [they] now mean the establishment point of view… Journalists don’t sit down and think, ‘I’m now going to speak for the establishment.’ Of course not. But they internalise a whole set of assumptions, and one of the most potent assumptions is that the world should be seen in terms of its usefulness to the West, not humanity.”
John Pilger
Dorothy Thompson

“There is nothing to fear except the persistent refusal to find out the truth.”
Dorothy Thompson
“As touchy as cabaret performers and as stubborn as factory machinists….”
Tom Rachman
“I have to be accurate; I don’t have to be impartial”
― John Burns,
“We had all opted to take City’s financial reporting course work, which, in theory, meant we wanted to write about stock prices and corporate takeovers. That, of course, was a joke. No one still in their twenties, and broke, goes into journalism to write about money—a subject in which they still have zero practical experience.”
Chris Ayres, War Reporting for Cowards
“Our stable and eternal verities are being challenged. There’s a kind of postmodern breakdown in journalism. The breadth of information sources and the speed of transmission are growing; but the traditional gravity of news has eroded. -Jin Yongquan ”
Judy Polumbaum, China Ink: The Changing Face of Chinese Journalism
“The greatest influence over content was necessity–they had holes to fill on every page and jammed in any vaguely newsworthy string of words, provided it didn’t include expletives, which they were apparently saving for their own use around the office.”
Tom Rachman, The Imperfectionists
Christopher Hitchens

“Pettiness often leads both to error and to the digging of a trap for oneself. Wondering (which I am sure he didn’t) ‘if by the 1990s [Hitchens] was morphing into someone I didn’t quite recognize”, Blumenthal recalls with horror the night that I ‘gave’ a farewell party for Martin Walker of the Guardian, and then didn’t attend it because I wanted to be on television instead. This is easy: Martin had asked to use the fine lobby of my building for a farewell bash, and I’d set it up. People have quite often asked me to do that. My wife did the honors after Nightline told me that I’d have to come to New York if I wanted to abuse Mother Teresa and Princess Diana on the same show. Of all the people I know, Martin Walker and Sidney Blumenthal would have been the top two in recognizing that journalism and argument come first, and that there can be no hard feelings about it. How do I know this? Well, I have known Martin since Oxford. (He produced a book on Clinton, published in America as ‘The President We Deserve’. He reprinted it in London, under the title, ‘The President They Deserve’. I doffed my hat to that.) While Sidney—I can barely believe I am telling you this—once also solicited an invitation to hold his book party at my home. A few days later he called me back, to tell me that Martin Peretz, owner of the New Republic, had insisted on giving the party instead. I said, fine, no bones broken; no caterers ordered as yet. ‘I don’t think you quite get it,’ he went on, after an honorable pause. ‘That means you can’t come to the party at all.’ I knew that about my old foe Peretz: I didn’t then know I knew it about Blumenthal. I also thought that it was just within the limit of the rules. I ask you to believe that I had buried this memory until this book came out, but also to believe that I won’t be slandered and won’t refrain—if motives or conduct are in question—from speculating about them in my turn.”
Christopher Hitchens
“By focusing exclusively on the events of the day, journalism all but severs the connection between time and eternity. It makes the world appear to be nothing but an endless jumble of events through which it is difficult, if not impossible, to discern anything beyond the relatively base motivations of lust, calculated self-interest, and the will to power. In short, journalism is not able to communicate wisdom.”
Craig M. Gay, Way of the (Modern) World
Christopher Hitchens

“Playing pool with Korean officials one evening in the Koryo Hotel, which has become the nightspot for foreign businessmen and an increasing number of diplomats (to say nothing of the burgeoning number of spies and journalists traveling under second identities), I was handed that day’s edition of the Pyongyang Times. At first glance it seemed too laughable for words: endless pictures of the ‘Dear Leader’—Little Boy’s exalted title—as he was garlanded by adoring schoolchildren and heroic tractor drivers. Yet even in these turgid pages there were nuggets: a telegram congratulating the winner of the Serbian elections; a candid reference to the ‘hardship period’ through which the country had been passing; an assurance that a certain nuclear power plant would be closed as part of a deal with Washington. Tiny cracks, to be sure. But a complete and rigid edifice cannot afford fissures, however small. There appear to be no hookers, as yet, in Pyongyang. Yet if casinos come, can working girls be far behind? One perhaps ought not to wish for hookers, but there are circumstances when corruption is the only hope.”
Christopher Hitchens, Love, Poverty, and War: Journeys and Essays
“I think journalism anywhere should be based on social justice and impartiality, making contributions to society as well as taking responsibility in society. Whether you are capitalist or socialist or Marxist, journalists should have the same professional integrity. –Tan Hongkai”
Judy Polumbaum, China Ink: The Changing Face of Chinese Journalism
“Verbosity was an established Victorian trait.”
Matthew Engel, Tickle The Public: One Hundred Years Of The Popular Press
“I think that of all the principles for journalism, the most important is to complicate simple things and simplify complicated things. At first sight, you may think something is simple, but it may conceal a great deal. However, facing a very complex thing, you should find out its essence. -Jin Yongquan”
Judy Polumbaum, China Ink: The Changing Face of Chinese Journalism
“It takes a lot of moola to fool around with national magazines, regardless of their politics. It takes even more if the paper is hell bent on shoving a hot poker up the rear end of the Establishment, as that editorial posture is not conducive to a massive influx of advertising dollars…a lot of people on the left still cherish the idea that Ramparts went under because I bought people drinks.”
Warren Hinckle, If You Have a Lemon, Make Lemonade
Christopher Hitchens

“I have had my mother’s wing of my genetic ancestry analyzed by the National Geographictracing service and there it all is: the arrow moving northward from the African savannah, skirting the Mediterranean by way of the Levant, and passing through Eastern and Central Europe before crossing to the British Isles. And all of this knowable by an analysis of the cells on the inside of my mouth.I almost prefer the more rambling and indirect and journalistic investigation, which seems somehow less… deterministic.”
Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22: A Memoir
“I think journalism anywhere should be based on social justice and impartiality, making contributions to society as well as taking responsibility in society. Whether you are capitalist or socialist or Marxist, journalists should have the same professional integrity. –Tan Hongkai”
Judy Polumbaum, China Ink: The Changing Face of Chinese Journalism
“Verbosity was an established Victorian trait.”
Matthew Engel, Tickle The Public: One Hundred Years Of The Popular Press
“I think that of all the principles for journalism, the most important is to complicate simple things and simplify complicated things. At first sight, you may think something is simple, but it may conceal a great deal. However, facing a very complex thing, you should find out its essence. -Jin Yongquan”
Judy Polumbaum, China Ink: The Changing Face of Chinese Journalism
“It takes a lot of moola to fool around with national magazines, regardless of their politics. It takes even more if the paper is hell bent on shoving a hot poker up the rear end of the Establishment, as that editorial posture is not conducive to a massive influx of advertising dollars…a lot of people on the left still cherish the idea that Ramparts went under because I bought people drinks.”
Warren Hinckle, If You Have a Lemon, Make Lemonade
Christopher Hitchens

“I have had my mother’s wing of my genetic ancestry analyzed by the National Geographictracing service and there it all is: the arrow moving northward from the African savannah, skirting the Mediterranean by way of the Levant, and passing through Eastern and Central Europe before crossing to the British Isles. And all of this knowable by an analysis of the cells on the inside of my mouth.I almost prefer the more rambling and indirect and journalistic investigation, which seems somehow less… deterministic.”
Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22: A Memoir
Joseph O'Connor

“Everything is in the way the material is composed.”
Joseph O’Connor, Star of the Sea
Christopher Hitchens

“Call no man lucky until he is dead, but there have been moment of rare satisfaction in the often random and fragmented life of the radical freelance scribbler. I have lived to see Ronald Reagan called “a useful idiot for Kremlin propaganda” by his former idolators; to see the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union regarded with fear and suspicion by the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (which blacked out an interview with Miloš Forman broadcast live on Moscow TV); to see Mao Zedong relegated like a despot of antiquity. I have also had the extraordinary pleasure of revisiting countries—Greece, Spain, Zimbabwe, and others—that were dictatorships or colonies when first I saw them. Other mini-Reichs have melted like dew, often bringing exiled and imprisoned friends blinking modestly and honorably into the glare. E pur si muove—it still moves, all right.”
Christopher Hitchens, Prepared for the Worst: Selected Essays and Minority Reports
Andrew Vachss

“[I] settled down with the Daily News and the Post, glad to be back with journalism where all murders are “brutal,” all prosecutors are “tough,” and all blondes are
“attractive.” And any lawyer who cooperates with the reporter is
“high-powered.”
Andrew Vachss, Only Child
“I would tell young journalists to be brave and go against the tide. When everyone else is relying on the internet, you should not; when nobody’s walking, you should walk; when few people are reading profound books, you should read. … rather than seeking a plusher life you should pursue some hardship. Eat simple food. When everyone’s going for quick results, pursue things of lasting value. Don’t follow the crowd; go in the opposite direction. If others are fast, be slow. — Jin Yongquan”
Judy Polumbaum, China Ink: The Changing Face of Chinese Journalism
“The press has the power to stimulate people to clean up the environment prevent nuclear proliferation force crooked politicians out of office reduce poverty provide quality health care
for all people and even to save the lives of millions of people as it did in Ethiopia in 1984. But instead we are using it to promote sex violence and sensationalism and to line the pockets of already wealthy media moguls.’Dr Carl Jensen founder of Project Censored”
Ian Hargreaves, Journalism: A Very Short Introduction
Jonah Goldberg

“Tip to all British tabloids: Do Not Hack Amy Winehouse’s Phone. I repeat: Do Not Hack Amy Winehouse’s Phone.”
Jonah Goldberg
Albert Londres

“Notre rôle n’est pas d’être pour ou contre, il est de porter la plume dans la plaie.”
Albert Londres
Glenn Greenwald

“The term propaganda rings melodramatic and exaggerated, but a press that—whether from fear, careerism, or conviction—uncritically recites false government claims and reports them as fact, or treats elected officials with a reverence reserved for royalty, cannot be accurately described as engaged in any other function.”
Glenn Greenwald, A Tragic Legacy: How a Good vs. Evil Mentality Destroyed the Bush Presidency
Jeff Rice

“This ‘vampire’ stuff is to stay right in this room. Until we have the assailant in custody we say nothing about these girls being drained of blood. No more rumors. No reports in the papers,” he added, looking directly at me and ignoring my colleague from the opposition press. “The official opinion at this time is that the cause of death is ‘undetermined and under investigation’. We don’t want to start a panic. It’s bad for police operations. It’s bad for the people. And it’s had for business.”
Jeff Rice, The Night Stalker
“Writing is for men who can think and feel, not mindless sensation seekers out of nightclubs and bars. But these are bad times. We are condemned to work with upstarts, clowns who no doubt got their training in a circus and then turned to journalism as the appropriate place to display their tricks.”
Naguib Mahfouz,
Michael Moore

“The working people of the Flint area hated this rag, but it was our only daily so you read it. Everyone called it the “Flint Urinal.” Editorially, the paper had historically been on the wrong side of every major social and political issue of the twentieth century — “the wrong side” meaning: whatever side the union workers were on, the Urinal took the opposite position.”
Michael Moore, Here Comes Trouble
Michael Moore

“One thing I learned as a journalist is that there is at least one disgruntled person in every workplace in America — and at least double that number with a conscience. Hard as they try, they simply can’t turn their heads away from an injustice when they see one taking place.”
Michael Moore, Here Comes Trouble
Elizabeth Massie

“(aspiring journalist to Carl Kolchak)
‘Andy knows I want to be a reporter. Like you’
This took me by surprise. ‘Sallie, my dear, nobody wants to be a reporter like me.”
Elizabeth Massie, Kolchak: The Night Stalker Casebook
George Packer

“[O]nce demagogy and falsehoods become routine, there isn’t much for the political journalist to do except handicap the race and report on the candidate’s mood.”
George Packer
Lauren Beukes

“You have to get up pretty early in the morning to invent the news.”
Lauren Beukes, Zoo City
“How paltry are the traces left behind by a life, even one concentrated around those supposed things of permanence called words. We spend our time upon the earth and then disappear, and only one one-thousandth of what we were lasts. We send all those bottles out into the ocean and so few wash up on shore.”
John Darnton, Almost a Family: A Memoir
Jon Ronson

“Shall we go?’ he murmured, perhaps regretting his decision to show me his army of plastic cartoon figurines.”
Jon Ronson
Jarod Kintz

“I’ve found newspapers only useful as kindling material for campfires. It’s been said that newspaper articles are written at a fifth grade reading level. If so, I can’t figure out why journalists would write something that the average high school senior can’t even read.”
Jarod Kintz
Margaret Atwood

“The newspaper journalists like to believe the worst; they can sell more papers that way, as one of them told me himself; for even upstanding and respectable people dearly love to read ill of others.”
Margaret Atwood, Alias Grace
“If you don’t hit a newspaper reader between the eyes with your first sentence, there is no need of writing a second one. ”
Arthur Brisbane
“London is one of the world’s centres of Arab journalism and political activism. The failure of left and right, the establishment and its opposition, to mount principled arguments against clerical reaction has had global ramifications. Ideas minted in Britain – the notion that it is bigoted to oppose bigotry; ‘Islamophobic’ to oppose clerics whose first desire is to oppress Muslims – swirl out through the press and the net to lands where they can do real harm.”
Nick Cohen
“I used to think the most important thing for a reporter was to be where the news is and be the first to know. Now I feel a reporter should be able to effect change. Your reporting should move people and motivate people to change the world. Maybe this is too idealistic. Young people who want to be journalists must, first, study and, second, recognize that they should never be the heroes of the story. ..A journalist must be curious, and must be humble. –Zhou Yijun”
Judy Polumbaum, China Ink: The Changing Face of Chinese Journalism
Michael Hastings

“Janet Malcolm had famously described journalism as the art of seduction and betrayal. Any reporter who didn’t see journalism as “morally indefensible” was either “too stupid” or “too full of himself,” she wrote. I disagreed. Without shutting the door on the possibility that I was both stupid and full of myself, I’d never bought into the seduction and betrayal conceit. At most, journalism – particularly when writing about media-hungry public figures – was like the seduction of a prostitute. The relationship was transactional. They weren’t talking to me because they liked me or because I impressed them; they were talking to me because they wanted the cover of Rolling Stone.”
Michael Hastings, The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Inside Story of America’s War in Afghanistan
“Basically, financial reporting is this sinking hole at the centre of journalism. You start by swimming around it until finally, reluctantly, you can’t fight the pull anymore and you get sucked down the drain into the biz pages.”
Tom Rachman, The Imperfectionists
Howard Zinn

“I knew that a historian (or a journalist, or anyone telling a story) was forced to choose, out of an infinite number of facts, what to present, what to omit. And that decision inevitably would reflect, whether consciously or not, the interests of the historian.”
Howard Zinn, A People’s History of the United States: 1492 to Present
Joan Didion

“My only advantage as a reporter is that I am so physically small, so temperamentally unobtrusive, and so neurotically inarticulate that people tend to forget that my presence runs counter to their best interests. And it always does.”
Joan Didion
Jon Ronson

“We journalists love writing about eccentrics. We hate writing about impenetrable, boring people. It makes us look bad: the duller the interviewee, the duller the prose. If you want to get away with wielding true, malevolent power, be boring.”
Jon Ronson, The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry
“‎Theorists of journalism have long noted parallels to Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle in physics: by reporting on something, one subtly but irrevocably changes it.”
Ben Yagoda, The Art of Fact: A Historical Anthology of Literary Journalism
“Einen guten Journalisten erkennt man daran, dass er sich nicht gemein macht mit einer Sache, auch nicht mit einer guten Sache; dass er überall dabei ist, aber nirgendwo dazugehört”
Hanns Joachim Friedrichs
Masha Hamilton

“I think I was always interested in the larger world, even as a kid, and my experiences as a journalist only heightened that interest. Covering conflict, I learned that though leaders often try to create a sense of “us” and “them,” the differences are not that delineated. I often felt like it was a whole bunch of “us,” with some of “them” scattered around. That made me feel that the borders we draw around ourselves are often artificial.

Masha Hamilton
“Media work needs ideals. Maybe thirty years from now, after I retire, I’ll see the media mature and make the transition from political party, interest group, and corporate to truly public. But over the next ten years, the encroachment of commercialism and worldliness will loom much larger than the democratization we imagine. -Jin Yongquan in China Ink”
Judy Polumbaum
George Orwell

“* *Do remember that dishonesty and cowardice always have to be paid for.*Don’t imagine that for years on end you can make yourself the boot-licking propagandist of the Soviet régime, or any other régime, and then suddenly return to mental decency. Once a whore, always a whore.”
George Orwell, As I Please: 1943-1945
“I’m an unabashed elitist. Everyone needs a good editor, and there is peril in worshiping amateurism and the unedited in science, art, and journalism.”
K Lee Lerner
“Journalism is an act of faith in the future”
Ann Curry
Nassim Nicholas Taleb

“Most info-Web-media-newspaper types have a hard time swallowing the idea that knowledge is reached (mostly) by removing junk from peoples heads”
Nassim Nicholas Taleb
“A short story is a writer’s way of thinking through experience… Journalism aims at accuracy, but fiction’s aim is truth. The writer distorts reality in the interest of a larger truth.”
John L’Heureux
“Like so many others of my tenure and temperament—stubborn ancients, I suppose—web reporting is anathema to everything I love about newspapering: getting a tip, developing leads, fleshing-out the details, then telling the story. Now it stops with the tip. Just verify (hopefully!) and post it. I didn’t write stories anymore; I ‘produced content.”
Chris Rose
                                              THANK YOU FOR VISIT……!

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